Culinary Experience: Mangoes, mangoes, mangoes…and passion fruit

This is going to make me sound like the worst foodie, but I had NO IDEA there were so many different kinds of mangoes.  As far as I can tell, I have eaten three different kinds. All of them different, but OH SO DELICIOUS!!!!

This is the mango tree that is next to my building. Today I learned that the mangoes on this tree aren’t ripe yet, but when they are, they will start falling. And then I am to get my fanny out there in the mornings and pick up them up. Before the monkeys, birds, bugs and chickens get them.

This is the heavily laden mango tree next door

This is the heavily laden mango tree next door

I can’t wait until these bad boys ripen and start to fall.

Look at all those mangoes!

Look at all those mangoes!

Now, I have no idea what kind of mangoes these are. My Google search skills are leading me in the direction of Pawi (Pere Louis) mangoes. Anyway, I got to try one this morning as Velda, the cleaning lady and an absolute joy, helped me find a good one that had fallen. It was not very big, about the size of a small nectarine, and the skin was a nice yellow colour.  Kind of like this, but mine didn’t have any holes in it.

Half-eaten Pawi mangoes I saw at the beach

Half-eaten Pawi mangoes I saw at the beach

The flesh of this mango, was firm, but rather creamy and not stringy. I didn’t have to brush my teeth right after eating it. The flavour was sweet with none of the tannin and astringency I sometimes find with the mangoes back home.

Last night Shawn had a couple of mangoes and he said they were different from the ones I had been getting (Julies) and the ones from the tree next door. Again, my Google searching is making me think that I may have had a Bombay mango. The flavour of this mango was unlike anything I had ever tasted before. It was rich and complex, with hints of almost cinnamon and caramel. I didn’t get a picture of it, because I never really thought I’d be doing a blog post on mangoes.

The last kind of mango seems to be the most common, or at least, the kind I’ve eaten the most. It’s called the Julie mango and again, the flavour just blows me away. It’s sweet, but has some tartness to it. And again, the texture is pretty much fiber free.

An unripe Julie mango. Some crimson will appear on the skin as the fruit ripens

An unripe Julie mango. Some crimson will appear on the skin as the fruit ripens

The other culinary experience I’ve had lately came courtesy of Velda. Today she taught me how to make passion fruit juice.

Passion Fruit Juice

Ingredients:

  • 2 passion fruit
  • warm water
  • sugar (but real cane sugar from Barbados…I think white sugar would be meh)

Directions:

1. Cut passion fruit in half. Using a spoon, scoop the goopy insides and seeds out and put it all into a jug of some sort

2. Fill the jug with warm water

Passion fruit pulp and water in my container

Passion fruit pulp and water in my container

3. Sweeten to taste with sugar

4. Serve over ice

This is really refreshing. It’s sweet, but not too sweet. It’s sour, but not too sour. I’m already thinking about how great this would be in a rum cocktail, with some lime and soda water.

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2 Responses to Culinary Experience: Mangoes, mangoes, mangoes…and passion fruit

  1. misskharisma says:

    Hi Love,

    Hot tip – you can pull mangoes off the tree early and they will ripen inside. they ripen quicker if you put them inside a brown paper bag as well. I always have to pull mine off before they are ripe because otherwise the neighbors, birds and bats get to them before I do! Also, if you can grab them early they won’t bruise once they fall and hit the ground!!!

    Like

    • Kathleen L. says:

      Oh. I know I can get them early. It’s a lack of storage space. I don’t have space to have mangoes in bags. So I go out every morning and grab 2 or 3 for the day.

      Like

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